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How kids learn to think like entrepreneurs

Where are the Shark Tank contestants of tomorrow? They may train at IDEA Lab Kids camps.

 

Students will plan and create inventive products at new IDEA Lab Kids entrepreneurship and design camps this summer.

 

It starts with thinking about a problem.

 

“Entrepreneurship builds empathy in students. It’s a way of thinking about people’s needs. Your neighbor has a need – what can you create to support that need? What needs are in the world and how can you use your ability to meet those needs?” said Jackie Boylhart, IDEA Lab Kids curriculum manager.

 

Each child explores an idea stemming from their interests and skills.

 

Next, teachers help students ponder solutions.

 

“Kids have the freedom to think. We give them the skills necessary so they can explore on their own,” said Boylhart.

 

Students can sketch a model or build a Lego prototype. Each child leaves with a finished product – one they can sell or use as a prototype for creating more.

 

Finally, they learn how to take their product to the world.

 

Besides learning how to design a product, students craft a plan to mass produce or market their product.

 

For example, a student with good handwriting might craft a new font at the design camp. Teachers at the camp discuss how he can sell that font and how and where to market it. Another student might design an innovative cell phone cover, and teachers will help her produce it on the camp’s 3D printing machine or laser cutter.

 

Students also explore engineering and design at the Tinker, Build and Explore camp. Campers have the freedom to invent a product, such as a Lego creation, and experiment with the design process. Teachers help the student plan how to market her design in the world of Lego.

 

About IDEA Lab Kids

 

Ghazal Qureshi founded IDEA Lab Kids (IDEA stands for Innovate, Discover, Explore, Achieve) in 2011 so her children could have enriching summer and after-school experiences that fit her schedule. She started in a rented space with 11 camps. Demand helped the program expand to other areas of Houston. Now franchises have popped up across the U.S., Canada, India and Oman, and other locations are pending worldwide.

 

Each IDEA Lab Kids camp stands alone – students may enroll at all ages and skill levels. Participants explore their interests, ponder how the world works and consider how they can make a difference. Camps focus on STEAM skills (science, technology, engineering, art and math).

 

Other IDEA Lab Kids camps include Jr. Coding Lab with Dash Robots, Drone Building and Aviation Design, My Very First Business: 3D Printed Rock Pets, and more.

 

Learn more about IDEA Lab Kids programs at www.idealabkids.com.

 

  • Freedom to create
  • Design thinking
  • Tools to explore

 

 

How kids learn to think like entrepreneurs

“What is a problem in the world, and how can I solve it?” – Students in IDEA Lab Kids learn to look at the universe in a new way with new entrepreneurship and design camps this summer.

It’s never too early to encourage kids to explore, create and solve problems, and the new camps give students freedom to do just that.

“Entrepreneurship builds empathy in students. It’s a way of thinking about people’s needs. Your neighbor has a need — what can you create to support that need? What needs are in the world and how can you use your ability to meet those needs?” said Jackie Boylhart, IDEA Lab Kids, curriculum manager.

At open-ended tinkering and design camps, each child explores an idea stemming from their interests and skills. They explore a process called design thinking, where they dive into understanding a need and working to find a solution.

“Kids have the freedom to think. We give them the skills necessary so they can explore on their own,” said Jackie.

Students leave with a finished product – one they can sell or use as a prototype for creating more. Besides learning how to design a product, students dive into marketing and crafting a plan to produce or promote their product.

For example, a student with good handwriting might craft a new font at the design camp. Teachers at the camp discuss how he can sell that font and how and where to market it. Another student might design an innovative cell phone cover and teachers will help her produce it on the camp’s 3D printing machine or laser cutter.

Students also explore engineering and design at tinkering camp, where they have the freedom to create a product, like a Lego contraption, and experiment with the design process, trial and error, and tweaking an idea. Teachers will help facilitate where the student could market her design in the world of Lego.

Ghazal Qureshi founded IDEA Lab Kids (IDEA stands for Innovate, Discover, Explore, Achieve) in 2011 so her children could have enriching summer and after-school experiences that fit her schedule. She started in a rented space with 11 camps, and demand helped the program expand to other areas of Houston. Now franchises have popped up across the U.S., Canada and Oman, and other locations are pending worldwide.

 

Each IDEA Lab Kids camp stands alone – students may come in at all ages and skill levels and explore their interests, learn a new skill and ponder how the world works and they can make a difference. Camps focus on STEAM skills (science, technology, engineering, art and math).

Other IDEA Lab Kids camps include

Learn more about IDEA Lab Kids programs at www.idealabkids.com.

How do you teach kids to think outside the box and become entrepreneurs? The same way adults learn. 

 

At IDEA Lab kids students have the freedom to explore, create and ask questions. 

 

How kids learn to think like entrepreneurs

 

How do you teach kids to think outside the box and become entrepreneurs? The same way adults learn. 

 

At IDEA Lab kids students have the freedom to explore and create. 

 

Explore

Produce

Facilitate

Talk to experts 

Tools tinkering 

 

Why kids should learn to think like entrepreneurs

 

 

  • Empathy
  • Design thinking
  • Problem solving

 

 

Product used in everyday life

 

Stanford 3d printing program

Statistics about why kids need to be entrepreneurs….

Other camps?

Graphic design program

University design school

Design thinking

Credo what enginers use in the field we’re tring to make it more age appropriate for children.

It’s a thought process why take math because it helps us learn a way of thinking

Bullet list of skills gained entrepreneurship

Or how kids can learn entrepreneurship at a young age.

Ideas????

Robotics lego contraption see it and set up account fto be

Being developed

K – 8

Make a product

Design thinking

Based on a need in a focus group

 

Have people who are industry experts to teach facilitate it come from expert in the field.

 

Who’d buy it? What do people want that doesn’t exists?

 

For example, new font if handwriting is one of their skills. Patents sends instructions home. It’s open ended. I want to make a toy car teach and

“We want to leave students at the end of the camp with something tangible and a plan where they develop it,” said Jackie Boylhart.

IDEA Lab Kids owns a 3d printer and laser cutter so students can design a product such as a cell phone case and then see their design come to life.

Kids design and teachers produce they see finished product. Print prototype after course want to tak to someone

 

How does this relate to entrepreneurs? Why do they care?

What kids learn, adults can?

Bring kids to it?
Franchise?

Three entr. Tips ?

Three ways of thinking that

It’s never too early to encourage kids to explore, create and solve problems, and the new camps give students freedom to do just that.

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